Discovering The Truth

Throughout our personal and business lives we are exposed to deception.  Here are a few pointers in getting to the truth.

To tell a lie requires cognitive effort and over-control of behaviours.  The physiological changes that emerge and that the deceptor tries to quell are:

  • Heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  • Breath rate
  • Pitch and speed of voice
  • Blood circulation and temperature
  • Muscular freezing/twitching
  • Facial expressions
  • Blinking, closing of eyes and pupil size
  • Sweating

These can also be attributed to nervousness and stress, so how to tell the difference.

The alternate version of the truth being told is generally thought out at the surface level but can unravel as it is drilled into.  The physiological changes as the questioning is deepened can point you to unravelling the deception.

Stage 1 – Seek an explanation and description of the event

Stage 2 – Encourage the account to be expanded….anything else?

Stage 3 – Emotional questioning – how did you feel at the time, what was going through your mind

Stage 4 – Probe various sub-sets of the event

Stage 5 – Play it back – let me see if I understand you

Stage 6 – Specific questioning on weak areas of the story

What questions do you have?

We are happy to help. Please post your comment below or call Paul Leonard, Partner at Cooney Carey, on 01 677 9000. Alternatively, send him an email: pleonard@cooneycarey.ie

If this article helped you, please share it with other businesses.

Posted on September 11, 2019 by Paul Leonard

Fraud – Change Of Bank Details

These cases though widely known of are unfortunately still commonplace.  The fraudster manages to change the bank payment details of a legitimate supplier so that the payment is diverted to the fraudster.

They do this by sending forged or altered versions of legitimate documents, invoices and/or emails that then flow through the organisation’s normal payment system.

The fraudster normally obtains data such as company invoices, via email phishing attacks and spyware or from colluding insiders.

The fraudsters often pay “runners” as fronts to open bank accounts into which conned organisations unwittingly send their payments.  By the time the legitimate supplier contacts the organisation for payment, the fraudster has withdrawn the funds or transferred them.

The runners are identified by the banks and sometimes apprehended but not always prosecuted because they often seek ignorance.

What questions do you have?

We are happy to help. Please post your comment below or call Paul Leonard, Partner at Cooney Carey, on 01 677 9000. Alternatively, send him an email: pleonard@cooneycarey.ie

If this article helped you, please share it with other businesses.

Posted on April 3, 2019 by Paul Leonard

4 Important Steps In Any Investigation

To truly understand and quantify a disputed amount we go beyond examining the detail to question the underlying assumptions and identify the relevant facts.

Let’s look at each of the 4 key steps in any investigation:

1. Identify the Type of Fraud

The initial stages of the investigation are the most important. There are so many ways that people commit fraud and new types of frauds are being committed every day. Determining what category of fraud has occurred will ensure that you can find the right contacts to help you along the way.

2. Create an Investigation Plan

Creating a plan is an important and often overlooked part of the fraud investigation. It takes time, but it keeps investigations Read more

Posted on December 13, 2017 by Lisa Byrne

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